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Truth in Translation, by Jason BeDuhn (who is not George Kaplan, nor Jason David BeDuhn is an associate professor of religious studies at. “Truth in Translation” by Jason DeBuhn FREE Download The book touts the NWT to be the most accurate translation, so it has become immensely popular I find linguists not to have that bias, as beDuhn and Kedar show. Jason David BeDuhn, Truth in Translation: Accuracy and Bias in English Translations of the New Testament. University Press of America. Reviewed by.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Written with the student and interested public in mind, Truth in Translation aims to explain what is involved and what is at stake in Bible translation. It begins with brief treatments of the background to the Bible and its translation, the various approaches to translation, and the specific origins of nine translation versions in wide use in the English-speaking world tod Written with the student and interested public in mind, Truth in Translation aims to explain what is involved and what is at stake in Bible translation.

It begins with brief treatments of the background to the Bible and its translation, the various approaches to translation, and the specific origins of nine translation versions in wide use in the English-speaking world today.

It then proceeds to compare those versions on nine points of translation, ranging from individual terms, to difficult passages, to whole categories of grammar. The book serves to inform readers of the forces at work shaping the meaning of the Bible, to help in their selection of Bible translations, and to act as a critical catalyst for the improvement of Bible translations through more careful attention to the risk of bias in the translation process.

Jason BeDuhn

Paperbackdavkd. Published April 29th by University Press of America first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Truth in Translationplease sign up. Lists with This Book.

Nov 27, Steve rated it really liked it. This is a fantastically important book for all those seriously interested in what the Bible actually says. BeDuhn demonstrates theological bias in every major translation he reviews, and with some surprising results.

Mostly very accessible to the non-scholarly aside from a couple later chapters that get a bit bogged down in probably necessary Greek syntax.

A comprehensive review of Truth in Translation by Jason BeDuhn.

Either skip or slog through them and read the final chapter. I am hoping for something inn to come out that will address many of the ne This is a fantastically important book for all those seriously interested in what the Bible actually says. I am hoping for something similar to come out that will address many of the newer translations in the past decade or bbeduhn.

View all 4 comments. May 03, Valerie Nicgorski rated it it was amazing.

Analysis of Bible Translations Accuracy very Enlightening! Nov 13, Jason Harris rated it liked it. My review from several years ago originally posted elsewhere: I’ll give some positive points and then I’ll list my concerns. Truth in Translation is a carefully crafted and scholarly work. BeDuhn brings a wealth of research and knowledge to the table.

The subtitle is “accuracy and bias in English translations of the New Testament. He argues that too often, even in mainstream translations, the translators make the subtle journey from translation to interpretation.

BeDuhn’s chapter The Work of Translation was very bedunh. In it, he lays out the spectrum of translation philosophies from a Interlinear to b Formal Equivalence to c Dynamic Equivalence to d Paraphrase. Trahslation David BeDuhnHere are some of my concerns with the book: I felt that BeDuhn’s understanding and awareness of the modern debate on translations, at least within Christian Fundamentalism, was lacking.

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This revealed itself in a lot of ways, but once in particular where he made bedhn statement which seemed to indicate that he hadn’t studied the preface of the publication of the Authorised Version though trying to make a point about that edition. Transoation seems to operate under the impression that he has avoided all bias in his analysis. At no point in the book does he reveal his own personal theological biases not even to the point where you could confidently nail him as an evangelical.

Yet I would argue that it is impossible for him beduhnn to have theological biases. He could have engendered a much higher level of trust with his readership had he admitted his position and biases early on in the book. If I had to peg him based on what little he gives away about himself, I would suspect he is a theological Liberal. BeDuhn seems to work from a basis of absolute neutrality on basic fundamentals of the faith such as the trqnslation of Jesus Christ.

While he seems to view translattion as a virtue, particularly in the context of translation work, one has to question what kind of epistemology allows this type of writing. Isn’t failing to presuppose the deity of Christ in translation which is inherently interpretive Can we really accurately translate the Scripture under the belief that we must not presuppose any theological conclusions?

BeDuhn readily recognised the necessity of understanding the a linguistic context, b literary context, traslation c historical and cultural environment in translation.

Would we attempt a translation in any other setting which ignored interpretive context? BeDuhn fails to recognise that all translation necessarily involves an element of interpretation. It is simply impossible to translate the entire NT with no interpretive bias.

nason

There are often many English words which can be used. Each time we choose one of those words, we have a whole range of linguistic, literary, cultural, historical, and interpretative or contextual arguments for why we feel that is the best English word to communicate the meaning and nuance of the Greek word.

BeDuhn’s selection of passages to consider demonstrates a certain bias. In chapter thirteen, BeDuhn says “The selection of passages has not been arbitrary. It has been driven mostly by an idea of where one is most likely to find bias, namely, those passages which are frequently cited as having great theological importance.

Is this the only doctrine which might be subject to bias in Scripture? Further, several of the passages he cites are passages which are consistent with the deity of Christ, but would not be used to prove the deity of Christ. BeDuhn fails to make a distinction between a passage which proves a particular point, and a passage which is merely consistent with a particular point.

It is one thing to translate something interpretively in a way which is consistent with a particular theological bias such as translating proskuneo as “worship” instead of “homage. I feel that to treat these two on the same level obscures the complexities involved in translation.

BeDuhn develops a serious credibility leak in his dealing with several established Greek grammar rules. Particularly, he addresses Colwell’s Rule and the Granville Sharp rule.

Instead of merely critiquing them and offering adjustments or developments to them, in both cases he simply says they are wrong and should be ignored.

In one case, he actually argues that exceptions to the rule prove that it is not a rule rranslation all. The folly of such a statement is obvious.

Conclusion I wouldn’t claim to have done significant in-depth consideration of this book, but I did want to record my impressions after a quick perusal.

Truth in Translation : Jason David BeDuhn :

Overall, I think the book has helped me to look at translation work more critically. I would recommend the book to those who have already read fairly widely on the subject of texts and translations and who are very discerning.

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Otherwise, I would recommend reading at a more basic level bbeduhn so that you can read this material more critically and knowledgeably. That said, this book is written at a level which would be accessible to a fairly broad range of believers. View all 15 comments. I have never considered any of the books I have rated on Goodreads susceptible to achieving only one star but this book does it.

This book is great for readers in explaining the way translation is done but fails at everything else. Only a reader with considerable amount of knowledge on the subjects should read this unless an uneducated one wishes to follow this hogwash. Among these are his constant lapsing into his own I have never considered any of the books I have rated on Goodreads susceptible to achieving only one star but this book does it. Among these are his constant lapsing into his own bias interpretation, incorrect handling of John 1: Even his selection of passages, which coincidentally mostly deal with the divinity of Jesus, are a very small collection to assess the accuracy of all the translations.

This book has no academic support and neduhn incredibly false.

“Truth in Translation” by Jason DeBuhn FREE Download

Please read academic papers and books that critique this book. This book should be listed as Jehovah Witness Apologetic book instead of the author’s claim to an unbiased academic report. Sep 09, Joshua rated it it was amazing. I’ve now read it twice, and found the explanation of Biblical Greek very helpful and interesting.

To be clear, this is not a simple read. There is a good amount of detail about how Biblical Greek works on a fairly low level What I appreciated about the book was the idea that just because most translations handle a passage in a certain way doesn’t mean that that is the most accurate way to handle it.

Just like in life, being in the davod doesn’t equal being in the right. I definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in finding the best possible English translation of the Bible.

Oct 24, Joe Cummings rated it it was amazing. Of course when Paul was writing to Timothy, he was referring to the Septuagint Bible. It this was the only “Scripture” that they read and knew.

At “All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness,” 2 Timothy 3: At the time, the books of what became the New Testament, except for Paul’s letters, had not been written. Nevertheless, for many Christians this passage applies to the New Testament, too, inasmuch as it is teuth as the fulfillment of the Hebrew Bible.

Unfortunately, not many of us can read or understand the subtleties of year-old Greek grammar or are that familiar with the history and culture of those times. So we learn about the Scriptures, both new and old, by reading translations-specifically for me, English translations.

When you see how different some of the English translations are, the very reasonable question arises “Which version of the New Testament translations is the most accurate and least bias? In this book, the associate professor of religious studies at Northern Arizona University, examines key trznslation of translation in nine popular English language New Testaments that represent a cross-section of different denominational efforts.