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From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the Rise of Digital Utopianism. Available at In the early s, . From Counterculture to Cyberculture has ratings and 44 reviews. Warwick said: This is a sad story in many ways: I wonder if the author realises quite. Journal of e-Media Studies Volume I, Issue 1, Spring Dartmouth College Fred Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth.

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From Counterculture to Cyberculture

That said, you should have a strong interest in either the counterculture movement of the sixties or the development of nineties cyberculture especially the Well and Wired magazine if you plan on picking up this book. They all saw the Internet as a transformative technology that would finally allow people to talk about issues, share information, and govern themselves without governmental interference.

Thanks to their vision, counterculturalists and technologists alike joined together to reimagine computers as tools for personal liberation, the building of virtual and decidedly alternative communities, and the exploration of bold new social frontiers. But what actually comes across more strongly than anything is the notion that, even before it got started, Silicon Valley had been thoroughly coopted by right-wing politics and corporate interests.

By no means a hagiography of Brand or anyone else, Turner is quick to point out the shortcomings and failings of the movement, both in its manifestation of hippie back-to-the-land fantasies, and its co-evolution with the digital culture birthed by the rise A well-woven history of the ’60s counterculture, as personified in Stewart Brand, and its evolution into the cyberculture that came to prominence in the s with the Internet boom and, in some small part, informs the digital culture of today.

A bit dull, but well worth reading. A good biography of Stewart Brand would have been much more effective. I suppose you could say that.

History and Philosophy of Science. Made me reconsider a lot of ideas I now counterrculture I had uncritically swa A well-researched profile of Stewart Brand and his cohort, illustrating not only the nuances of the historical connection between communalist strains of the 60s counterculture and internet optimism post-cyberdelia in a more careful and accurate way than What the Dormouse Said but the incredible cyberculthre of Brand’s own reputation-building and power-building techniques which have been more recently replicated countercklture Tim O’Reilley.

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Was Brand a cause or an effect of larger social processes? Fred Turner here traces the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay—area entrepreneurs: Tom Schneiter College and Research Libraries. Stewart Brand clearly forged important links between the counterculturalism of the s and the libertarian, cyber networks of our time, but Turner fails to make a case for his lasting importance or to demonstrate that our contemporary digital culture would have been significantly different if Brand had never existed.

Refresh and try again. I’m not going to lie; I cybercultture swept along with Wired’s mid-’90s neon cyberspace revolution hype, without realizing it was always a future run by corporations.

From Counterculture to Cyberculture

Taking the Whole Earth Digital countercluture. It was popular with hippies and commune-dwellers — and, because it depended on user contributions for its reviews and editorials, it also became enormously influential among those who countercukture go on to build the new technological world.

If you are a student or an academic, then you might get on with this read. They also had individuals placed in booths around a central auditorium, miked their conversations, and replayed them simultaneously in an eighteen-channel remix.

How did the culture of computing become so closely allied with a self-contradictory mix of anti-authoritarian politics and communitarian ethos, after being identified with the military and large corporations in the s and s? According to Stern, the show was designed to lead viewers from “overload to spiritual meditation. God, this book sucks. This book shed light on how the many threads of contemporary cyberculture cyebrculture.

Networking the New Economy 7. The Cybernetic Brain Andrew Pickering.

If you are after I got this as I really enjoyed Stewart Brand’s last book, and wanted to know more about him. I’m only docking a star because Turner doesn’t spend enough time discussing the events or implications of the s Internet boom, nor does his forward-looking conclusion go far enough in examining the successes and mostly failures of Brand’s movement.

May 11, Michael rated it liked it. Apr 26, Vrom Hart rated it liked it Shelves: By no means a hagiography of Brand or anyone else, Turner is quick to point out the shortcomings and failings of the movement, both in its manifestation of hippie back-to-the-land fantasies, and its co-evolution with the digital culture birthed by the rise of home computing and Internet access for all.

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This is a sad story in many ways: Fred Turner here traces the previously untold story of a highly influential group of San Francisco Bay—area entrepreneurs: Ultimately, the failure of Brand’s movement was in its lack of a political agenda.

Note that it only goes up to the boom From Counterculture to Cyberculture is the first book to explore this extraordinary and ironic transformation. It connects us with how the internet, although originally designed as a tool for the military countercu,ture respond to a nuclear attack, it was interpreted by the counter culture movement as a potential tool to unite society.

But what actually comes across more strongly than anything is the notion that, even before it got started, Silicon Valley had been thoroughly coopted by right-wing politics and cor This is a sad story in many ways: Contained some great anecdotes but overall was very repetitive.

In the heady days of the Clinton Administr I initially picked this book since it discusses many events that were part of my life as well — from the Summer of Love in SF to working for the government on classified computer projects. But in both cases, they were wrong: Unlike many other histories that focus on the technical innovators.

This is an important book about the culture that existed countercculture the early years of the PC revolution and the creation of clunterculture Internet.

Well researched, structured, and densely packed with useful information. This chronicle of how a great countercultural icon like Stewart Brand could morph into the father of digital utopianism, following in the footsteps of Marshall McLuhan is a fascinating trip down memory lane for me.

Dec 07, Otis Chandler marked it as to-read.